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London’s ULEZ expansion to go ahead in August

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A ULEZ sign in London, UK
ULEZ is the zone where polluting vehicles can be charged £12.50 a day in London, UK.

Five councils have lost their high court challenge against the mayor of London Sadiq Khan’s plans to expand the capital’s ultra-low emission zone (ULEZ). The boroughs of Bexley, Bromley, Harrow, Hillingdon and Surrey County Council said they were ‘hugely disappointed’ with the ruling on Friday, July 28th, adding that the mayor and Transport for London (TfL) ‘do not realise the damage’ the extension of the zone will have when it starts to be implemented next month.

First introduced in central London on April 8, 2019, the ULEZ area was created to help reduce air pollution and improve air quality in the city. It covered the same area as the previous Congestion Charge Zone but had stricter emission requirements. Vehicles that do not meet the ULEZ standards have to pay £12.50, daily, to drive within the zone.  All 33 boroughs of Greater London, in some places bordering the M25, are expected to be part of the ultra-low emission zone (ULEZ) from 29 August 2023.

“This landmark decision is good news as it means we can proceed with cleaning up the air in outer London on 29 August. The decision to expand the ULEZ was very difficult and not something I took lightly and I continue to do everything possible to address any concerns Londoners may have.”, said The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, about his Landmark High Court win

However, as the cost of living continues to impact the finances of millions of people across the UK, many motorists in London fear they may end up impacted by the upcoming tax and may will need to certain areas of the city once it become part of the ultra-low emission zone.

“While the principle of cleaning up London’s air is the right one, it has come at a time where drivers can ill afford to replace their vehicles during a cost-of-living crisis. This is being made by worse by new evidence which shows drivers are having to pay far more than they should have to purchase a compliant vehicle on the second-hand car market. We’d very much like to see additional support given to certain key workers, both inside the capital and in neighbouring counties, who depend on their vehicles to help them switch to cleaner ones as affordably as possible.”, says Nicholas Lyes, head of roads policy at RAC.

Where is Ulez currently in London?

When Ulez was first introduced in 2019, it only covered a small area of central London, known as the congestion charge zone. It was expanded in 2021 to include boroughs in inner London like Tower Hamlets and Southwark.

Since 2021, Ulez has covered the following areas of inner London:

  • City of London
  • City of Westminster
  • Lambeth
  • Southwark
  • Lewisham
  • Greenwich
  • Newham
  • Tower Hamlets

Now, it will expand to cover Greater London, affecting boroughs like Barnet, Upminster, Wimbledon, and Wembley.

Where will Ulez expand to?

Ulez will expand to cover all areas in Greater London. Here are some of the more populous London areas Ulez will expand to on August 29, 2023:

North London

  • Barnet
  • Edgware
  • Edmonton 
  • Enfield
  • Finchley
  • Woodford

East London

  • Barking
  • Dagenham 
  • Ilford
  • Hornchurch 
  • Romford
  • Upminster
  • Welling 

South London

  • Biggin Hill
  • Bromley 
  • Croydon 
  • Kingston upon Thames
  • Mitcham
  • Sutton
  • Wimbledon

West London

  • Brentford
  • Harrow
  • Hayes 
  • Richmond
  • Ruislip
  • Southall
  • Twickenham
  • Wembley

You can use a tool on TfL’s website to see if the Ulez expansion will affect you. The ultra-low emission zone (ULEZ) operates 24 hours a day, midnight to midnight, every day of the year, except Christmas Day (25 December).

Over 90% of the cars seen driving regularly in outer London on an average day are ULEZ-compliant, but for the small proportion of non-compliant vehicles the Mayor has introduced a £110million scrappage scheme to help low-income and disabled Londoners and small businesses. The Mayor has always listened to concerns raised by Londoners and so from Monday 31 July the scheme expands further so that every family in receipt of child benefit in London (more than 870,000 people) and every small business is eligible for thousands of pounds in financial support if they have a non-compliant vehicle.

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Sustainability

Purina launches its first Ocean Restoration Program

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Purina Europe launches its first Ocean Restoration Program
Pet care brand is partnering with expert organizations to help restore 1 500 hectares in Europe

Purina Europe is partnering with expert organizations to help restore 1 500 hectares – the equivalent of around 3 700 football pitches – of marine habitats by 2030. Marine habitats provide a home to many species, including fish. Fish is part of Purina’s supply chain because it uses fish by-products, which are parts of fish that are not consumed by humans but provide a valuable ingredient in pet food, so that nothing goes to waste.

The pet care brand is investing in its partners’ ocean restoration solutions across Europe, with the aim of making these effective and scalable. Each partner targets species that are critical to restoring local marine habitats but are being depleted. The first phase of the program will last three years and prioritizes the development of research, a measurement framework and the conditions needed to scale up the restoration solutions efficiently and effectively. The second phase is planned to start in 2026 and will focus on scaling the proven solutions.

The Seagrass Consortium, represented by one of its founding partners, Sea Ranger Service, are building solutions to plant seagrass meadows, a key habitat-forming species, helping with biodiversity and capturing carbon. Oyster Heaven is using natural materials to reconstruct lost oyster reefs. Oysters generate biodiversity, provide a home for a multitude of different species and are natural water filterers, removing pollutants including excess nitrogen which helps improve water quality. Better water quality allows more sunlight to reach the seagrass meadows, enabling them to flourish.

Urchinomics is removing excess sea urchins, which have overgrazed seaweed (in this area, kelp) beds since their natural predators have diminished significantly. Their removal will help kelp to rebound. Seaweed acts as a natural purifier of water, providing habitats, food, and energy for many marine organisms, whilst absorbing and storing large amounts of carbon. SeaForester is using techniques such as mobile seaweed nurseries to restore rapidly disappearing seaweed forests.

“We are delighted to launch Purina Europe’s first Ocean Restoration Program. With marine biodiversity declining dramatically, collective restoration efforts are required. At Purina, we are committed to playing our part to help address the marine biodiversity loss in our extended supply chain. Therefore, together with our partners, we are taking an active role in helping restore marine habitats at-scale in Europe,” says Kerstin Schmeiduch, Director of Corporate Communications and Sustainability at Purina Europe.

“The structure of the program enables the group of expert partners working on restoring critical species across Europe to scale their solutions and share knowledge and expertise. This will help us collaborate efficiently and give the greatest chance of measuring and replicating success. Going forward, the program can contribute to creating training, employment and business opportunities for local communities,” says Harry Wright, CEO of Bright Tide.

Restoration efforts will take place in France (Arcachon Bay), the Netherlands (including Zeeland), Norway (Tromsø), and Portugal (Cascais & Peniche), while additional sites in Germany and the UK are being evaluated.

The Ocean Restoration Program is part of Purina Europe’s broader commitment to helping advance the regeneration of ocean and soil ecosystems.

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Competition for European Capital of Smart Tourism is now open

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A view of Bordeaux, France
Previous European Capital of Smart Tourism winners include Bordeaux, France, in 2022 | Photo: Guillaume Flandre

The European Commission has launched the 2025 edition of the European Capital of Smart Tourism and the European Green Pioneer of Smart Tourism competitions.

Tourism destinations across Europe can submit their innovative practices of smart and sustainable tourism to become leading examples in European tourism.

As the EU’s third largest eco-system, tourism plays a crucial role in economic growth and job creation. The Smart Tourism initiative recognises cities implementing new digital tools and practices such as equal opportunity and access to visitors, sustainable development and support to creative industries and local talent. With these competitions, the European Commission promotes and awards the future of smart and sustainable tourism in Europe.

To compete for the 2025 titles, cities must demonstrate their innovative tourism practices and submit their applications online. Applications will first be evaluated by a panel of independent experts. In the second step, shortlisted cities will be asked to present their city’s candidature in front of the European Jury. A Jury will select two winners, the ‘European Capital of Smart Tourism 2025’ and the ‘European Green Pioneer of Smart Tourism 2025’. The result will be announced in November 2024. 

Both competitions are open to cities across both the EU, as well as the non-EU countries that take part in the Single Market Programme (SMP).

The 2025 European Capital of Smart Tourism is the sixth edition of the competition. Dublin was selected as the 2024 Smart Capital. Previous winners include Pafos and Seville as 2023 Capitals and Bordeaux and València as the 2022 Capitals. Helsinki and Lyon won the inaugural competition and jointly held the 2019 titles.

Since 2024, there is only one winner of the European Capital of Smart Tourism competition due to a change in competition rules, whereas previous editions featured two winners annually.

The European Capital of Smart Tourism competition is open to cities with a population of over 100.000.

To find out more, visit the European Capital of Smart Tourism Guide for Applicants.

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Sustainability

The importance of sustainability initiatives for modern businesses

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The importance of sustainability initiatives for modern businesses
Research shows that almost three-quarters of employees believe environmentally sustainable companies make for more attractive employers. | Photo: Yan Krukau

Consumers are understandably shopping with more eco-awareness than ever before considering the current climate. Not only do they want assurances that the product was made ethically, but there’s also a growing curiosity about understanding where our products come from and the impact of their journey from mine to market.

At the same time, modern customers are also wising up to greenwashing schemes, meaning they aren’t going to blindly align themselves with the first company that appears to be doing the right thing. It’s important to invest in sustainable policies in the first place, but it’s even more important to invest in the right way.

Here we explore the core benefits to promoting sustainability initiatives across your company and explore how doing so can help to future-proof your organisation in the context of the rising climate crisis.

Retaining and attracting talent

Particularly with younger generations developing a widespread eco conscience, in order to open yourself up to the best candidates in the talent pool, it’s important to demonstrate that your company aligns with these beliefs. Research shows that almost three-quarters of employees believe environmentally sustainable companies make for more attractive employers. This means that not only will you be more appealing to prospective employees, but you’re also more likely to retain talent once they join your organisation. In addition, you may find that employees are happier working in a business that has strong eco-awareness, positively impacting upon staff morale and productivity. 

To leverage your green policies to attract more talent, it’s important to publicise the work you’re doing; keeping everything internalised means prospective hires won’t be able to fully understand the company’s principles. There are several ways you can do this, from advertising your policies on your website in a company handbook to including information on job postings. Celebrate the wins and progress you’ve made to position yourself as a forward-thinking company with a clear social conscience.

Potential cost savings

It’s a common misconception that adopting more eco-friendly policies will eat into your profit margins and come at the expense of business growth. But the opposite is true. There are so many examples of small changes businesses can make that can actually save huge amounts of money over time, helping to fuel more sustainable expansion.

One of the biggest areas for potential savings is in reducing waste. In 2021 alone, businesses in England produced an estimated 33.9 million tonnes of commercial and industrial waste. From food to documents, any items that contribute to this huge number ultimately amount to wasted money, while also contributing to the amount that ends up in landfill. Simple things like cutting down on inessential printed documents and using reusable coffee cups can make a huge difference.

In order for businesses to cut down on waste, it’s imperative that you get the buy-in from employees. Make waste reduction schemes accessible and provide staff the tools to reduce waste and ultimately cut costs. Even if teams are working remotely, you could provide training to educate employees on simple techniques to limit their waste, such as how to properly care for equipment to reduce the need for replacements.

Driving innovation

When businesses pledge to operate more sustainably, it encourages people at all levels to find more innovative solutions to long-standing problems. This is because they’re restricted by the ways in which they can use key resources such as water and carbon across the supply chain, encouraging them to use more inventive processes without diminishing the quality of their product or service.

Often, when businesses operate without much of an eco conscience, they’ll do as little as they can get away with and comply with only the lowest environmental standards. However, for companies who are looking to future-proof themselves and stay ahead of the curve, it’s advisable to conduct business in line with the strictest rules.

When the entire business is working to these higher standards, employees are encouraged to be proactive in solving problems to facilitate growth while also sticking to the wider corporate responsibility. Plus, you’ll be safeguarding yourself from future legislation roll-outs, with governments around the world likely to continually enforce more stringent rules to meet long-term sustainability goals.

Understanding the corporate climate

Time is running out for businesses across the globe to reduce their carbon footprint and play their part in protecting the planet for future generations. However large or small, every business has the opportunity to establish eco-friendly principles that can make a huge difference in their local communities and beyond. Best of all, your actions may just inspire others to do the same.

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