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Circular fashion set to become a long-lasting trend in 2021

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Digital device displaying Pablo Erroz website
Spanish designer Pablo Erroz stopped showcasing his collections as “seasons” three years ago

Don’t be surprised if models trotting down fashion runaways several times a year, to showcase endless collections, becomes a thing of the past. And the global pandemic is actually not the main reason that packed catwalks have been turned into digital events in 2020.

After years of telling people to buy more and wear more, designers from around the world are turning their talent to creating long-lasting pieces. They are advocating a circular way of fashion where people are expected to reuse and recycle; so they are being encouraged to invest in fewer clothes.

And although sustainable and circular fashion is the latest trend in an industry known for fast and disposable products, some brands have been focused on this approach for a while now.

Three years ago, Spanish designer Pablo Erroz stopped showcasing his collections as “seasons”. Instead, the creative, whom has been part of the design teams of Massimo Dutti and Bershka, now creates timeless garments. His Non-Seasonal 2022 collection, recently showcased at both Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Madrid and 080 Barcelona Fashion, taps into the concepts of sustainability and circularity – with all pieces being digitalized with embedded NFC tags via Blue Bite, a platform helping brands to digitally authenticate products. Blue Bite has worked with global fashion brands Adidas, Pinko and BVLGARI.

“We need a real commitment from brands to put sustainability over short-term profit. As a label, we must create without giving clothes an expiration date. We should always be thinking over the long term. It is also an evolution of our business model, where the concept of seasons has become obsolete. Afterall, we need to increase transparency to speak a common language that customers understand, so we can invite them to make those changes together.” – Believes Erroz, who launched his own label in 2012.

The sustainable business model of Pablo Erroz goes beyond having the same pieces used by several customers during its life cycle.

“The fact of eliminating the seasons and the genres in the garments, basically, is nothing more than a firm commitment to contribute to a more friendly and respectful consumption with the environment. Taking into account that resources are limited, we have also decided not to produce any fabrics for our collections. We buy stocks and thus also promote another type of business and a real circular economy”, says the designer.

Keeping an authentication process for each item guarantees that no-fake clothes enter the circular process. Consumers scans the NFC tag, getting a digitalized version of the piece — identified by a unique digital ID — that tells its full story, from the manufacturing process to a look into the future of the garment.

“We are happy to partner with Pablo Erroz to launch Blue Bite Circularity, which allows consumers to explore the origin story of the garment,” says Mikhail Damiani, CEO & Co-Founder of Blue Bite. “The circle continues as consumers authenticate the item, and, later in the product’s lifecycle, get location-based information on how to resell or upcycle the garment to keep it out of a landfill.”

With brands becoming more conscious with regards to sustainability, the next step will be to educate consumers on how they can embrace one of the pillars of high-end fashion: less is more.

EuroNewsweek is a dynamic news platform featuring lifestyle, sustainability, successful stories, tech, leadership, creative marketing, business, and the unstoppable people behind them.

Sustainability

Sky inks 10-year deal for clean energy in Scotland

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A windfarm in Scotland
Starting in 2025, Sky will receive 100 GWh annually of clean, renewable energy from the Crossdykes Wind Farm

Sky has signed a 10-year agreement with Octopus Renewables Infrastructure Trust to receive renewable energy from the Crossdykes Wind Farm in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Under this agreement, Sky will receive the majority of renewable energy guarantees of origin (REGOs) generated from the 46 MW wind farm, which will help Sky reduce the emissions associated with its electricity use.

Starting in 2025, Sky will receive 100 GWh annually of clean, renewable energy from the Crossdykes Wind Farm, approximately 69% of the total power generated by the project. This is equivalent to approximately 34,000 UK homes’ annual electricity use. [1]

The agreement is a key part of Sky’s ongoing commitment to sourcing renewable electricity. From being the first media company to go carbon neutral in 2006, to launching the world’s first auto standby set top box – Sky has been committed to decarbonising its business for more than 15 years.

“This agreement is evidence of Sky’s commitment to reducing our environmental impact. We source the majority of our electricity in the UK from renewable energy and this long-term project in Lanarkshire provides us with lasting clean energy for years to come. As a media and entertainment company, we are determined to use our voice to help the media sector and the UK more broadly decarbonise,” acknowledges Fiona Ball, Group Director of the Bigger Picture and Sustainability at Sky.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), in 2022, renewable energy supply from solar, wind, hydro, geothermal and ocean rose by close to 8%, meaning that the share of these technologies in total global energy supply increased by close to 0.4 percentage points.

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Sustainability

Last day to enter the EU Organic awards

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Last day to enter the EU Organic awards
The EU Organic Awards was first held in 2022 | Photo: Zoe Schaeffer

Organic food producers in the EU will have until the end of the day to enter the EU Organic Awards 2024. It is the third year that the initiative will be offering a platform to a winner highlight excellence and innovation in the sector. The EU wants to increase organically farmed land to 25% by 2030.

The awards are organised by European Commission, with the EESC, the European Committee of the Regions, COPA-COGECA and IFOAM Organics Europe. The EESC supervises the nomination, shortlisting and award process for three categories: best organic food processing SME, best organic food retailer and best organic restaurant/food service.

“The EU Organic Awards give a recognition to the innovation, passion and dedication of those who truly champion organic food and production in the EU and bring it closer to everyday consumers,” says EESC President Oliver Röpke.

Last year’s winners from the categories for which the EESC supervises have also joined forces to encourage businesses to seek recognition.

Kevin Scully, whose business The Merry Mill was awarded the prize for the best organic food processing SME, urged companies to nominate themselves: “I recommend other businesses to apply for the Organic Awards because it’s very good for a company’s profile and brings a great endorsement.”

Paul Kolarik, head of Austrian eatery Kolarik im Prater that won the best organic restaurant award, said: “Winning the Organic Awards generated great interest in our business from the national media. Thanks to the awards, new collaborations have also emerged and many political representatives became aware of our commitment to the organic and sustainability sector.”

The awards ceremony takes place on 23 September 2024, which is the EU Organic Day.

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Applications open for the EU Organic awards 2024

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Applications open for the EU Organic awards 2024
The EU wants to increase organically farmed land to 25% by 2030 | Photo: Gregory Hayes

Organic food producers in the EU will have until May 12th to enter the EU Organic Awards 2024. It is the third year that the initiative will be offering a platform to a winner highlight excellence and innovation in the sector. The EU wants to increase organically farmed land to 25% by 2030.

The awards are organised by European Commission, with the EESC, the European Committee of the Regions, COPA-COGECA and IFOAM Organics Europe. The EESC supervises the nomination, shortlisting and award process for three categories: best organic food processing SME, best organic food retailer and best organic restaurant/food service.

“The EU Organic Awards give a recognition to the innovation, passion and dedication of those who truly champion organic food and production in the EU and bring it closer to everyday consumers,” says EESC President Oliver Röpke.

Last year’s winners from the categories for which the EESC supervises have also joined forces to encourage businesses to seek recognition.

Kevin Scully, whose business The Merry Mill was awarded the prize for the best organic food processing SME, urged companies to nominate themselves: “I recommend other businesses to apply for the Organic Awards because it’s very good for a company’s profile and brings a great endorsement.”

Paul Kolarik, head of Austrian eatery Kolarik im Prater that won the best organic restaurant award, said: “Winning the Organic Awards generated great interest in our business from the national media. Thanks to the awards, new collaborations have also emerged and many political representatives became aware of our commitment to the organic and sustainability sector.”

The awards ceremony takes place on 23 September 2024, which is the EU Organic Day.

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