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Guillaume Esmiol named co-Executive Director of the Cannes’ Marché du Film

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Guillaume Esmiol named co-Executive Director of the Cannes’ Marché du Film
Guillaume (L) joined the Marché du Film as Deputy Director in charge of development in 2020

Cannes Film Festival’s Executive director Jérôme Paillard will step down of his role in December 2022 during Ventana Sur, the co-production market that the Festival co-organizes with the INCAA, each year in Buenos Aires.

After confirming his wish to retire in May 2022, following the confirmed 75th Festival de Cannes, Paillard advised Pierre Lescure, President of the Festival, and Thierry Frémaux, General Delegate, to name by his side, Guillaume Esmiol as co-Executive Director of the Marché du Film, allowing them to work in tandem before seeing Esmiol replace permanently Paillard next year.

Guillaume, who joined the Marché du Film as Deputy Director in charge of development in 2020, was formerly Innovation Director for TF1 Group and Marketing Director for the startup studio Wefound, an experience that allowed him to bring his expertise in Digital, Media, and Innovation to the annual festival taking place in the French Riviera since 1946.

The reshuffle won’t be the only one taking place at the festival in 2022.

Paolo Moretti, Cannes’ Directors Fortnight artistic director, is also set to step down after May’s edition of the event.  The section running alongside the Cannes Film Festival will be his third and last edition as a director of the program.

Italian-born, Moretti joined Directors’ Fortnight in 2019 from the Roche-sur-Yon Festival, where he had been artistic director since 2014, and was the first non-French national to head any Cannes section.

With professionals from the cinema industry, international stars, and up-and-coming actors expected to turn up at the red carpet in larger numbers than in 2021, when Covid-related restrictions delayed the event and saw reduced attendance, the 75th edition of the Cannes Film Festival will take place from May 17 to 28, 2022.

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Nimesh Kataria to join England and Wales Cricket Board as CFO

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Nimesh Kataria to join England and Wales Cricket Board as CFO
Nimesh will succeed Scott Smith, who is leaving the ECB after eight years in the role.

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has announced Nimesh Kataria as new Chief Financial Officer.

Nimesh will join the ECB in April, and brings a wealth of experience and expertise in financial management and strategic planning. He will sit on the ECB Board.

“We are thrilled to welcome Nimesh to the ECB at an important time for our sport. His proven track record in financial management and strategic insight will be invaluable as we seek to grow cricket and become the most inclusive sport, whilst ensuring we put the game on a financially sustainable footing,” says Richard Gould, ECB Chief Executive Officer.

In his current role, Nimesh is Chief Financial Officer for WBD’s International Sports Division, overseeing Eurosport, Global Cycling Network, Discovery Sports Events and the Olympics. He also played a key role in the recent TNT Sports Joint Venture between WBD and BT. Nimesh began his career at Ernst & Young, before joining WBD.

“I am proud to be joining the ECB and hope to be able to play a part in growing cricket and helping even more people to fall in love with the sport. I’ve been a cricket fan my whole life, and while there are real challenges for the whole game in England and Wales to navigate, I’m excited by the opportunity we have to become the most inclusive sport and secure the future of cricket for future generations to play, watch and enjoy,” celebrates Nimesh Kataria.

In his new role, Nimesh will be responsible for financial reporting and business planning. His work will enable the organisation to budget effectively, control expenditure and deliver its revenue objectives. He will also lead key business services including Information and Technology and Procurement, as well as the Finance team.

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New study reveals the poorest presidents of Europe

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Nataša Pirc Musar, President of the Republic of Slovenia
Nataša Pirc Musar, head of the Republic of Slovenia, is the poorest president in Europe, study says | Photo: Matjaz Klemenc

Slovenia has the poorest president in Europe. Relative to average salaries, the presidents of Ukraine and Serbia follow closely as the second and third poorest on the continent. Across Europe, heads of state earn 4.1 times as much as the average earner and cost taxpayers €49.62 per hour. 

This is according to a new study by Slot.Day, who analysed the average gross salaries, GDP per capita and presidents’ earnings across 31 countries in Europe. The researchers used the latest available data from national statistics offices and the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), ranging between 2022 and the third quarter of 2023. GDP data is sourced from the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) World Economic Outlook, published in October 2023. Head of state income estimates are based on independent media reports, national legislation, government and presidency websites, income statements and official government communication. 

Europe’s poorest president lives in Slovenia. The president earns almost as much as any average employee in the country. The head of state has an estimated gross annual income of €44,701, only 3% higher than the current average salary in Slovenia – €43,342. An hour of the president’s time costs taxpayers €23.41 before deductions – one of the top 10 cheapest hourly pays for presidents in Europe. Slovenia is a country of medium wealth, whose GDP per capita (US$32,350) is slightly below the European average of US$34,710 for 2023, according to IMF estimates. The Slovenian president’s work is worth 1.5 of the country’s GDP per capita.  

Ukraine has the second lowest-paid president in Europe, relative to other average earners in the country. Based on official government communication, the Ukrainian president’s gross annual salary in 2023 was only €8,134, which is 1.63 worth of any average earner in the country. This is the lowest pay of any president in Europe, costing Ukrainian taxpayers only €4.26 per hour, before deductions, to carry out all their duties as head of state. Ukraine’s current GDP per capita is also the lowest in Europe, estimated at €5,245 for 2023. The president earns only 70% above that. 

Serbia’s president is the third poorest in Europe. With an hourly compensation of just €10.77, before tax, the head of state earns €20,564 per year. This is worth only 1.68 of the average salary in Serbia, estimated at €12,258. Serbia’s GDP per capita is the eighth lowest in Europe (US$11,301), and the president’s salary is almost double this amount. 

The presidents of Lithuania and Montenegro earn under two average salaries in their countries, while those in Croatia and Moldova earn just above this level. Finland, Latvia and Bosnia and Herzegovina complete the top 10 poorest presidents of Europe. Finland is the only country in Slot.Day’s ranking whose GDP per capita (US$54,507) is well above the European average (US$34,710).  

Richest presidents 

The richest presidents in Europe live in Bulgaria, Slovakia and Ireland when comparing their official incomes to average salaries.  

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Paul Royall appointed as Executive News Editor of the BBC News

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Paul was previously the channel's interim Executive News Editor

Journalist Paul Royall has been appointed as the Executive News Editor of the BBC News Channel on a permanent basis.

Royall was previously interim Executive News Editor – leading BBC News Channel’s single operation through the successful launch last year, and consistently delivering breaking news and public service journalism to audiences in the UK and across the world.

BBC News remains the most-watched news channel in the UK, and has a weekly audience of over 100m around the rest of the world. The single-news operation splits into a UK and international feed and joins up with important global news developments to offer audiences the very best of BBC journalism.

“I am delighted to be leading the BBC News channel on a permanent basis. This is a hugely talented team and I’m excited by everything we can achieve for audiences going forward. 2024 will be another momentous year of news, and it will be a privilege to be at heart of if for the channel,” says the new BBC News editor.

Prior to his role at the BBC News Channel, Paul edited the BBC News at Ten, Six and One, and has spent many years at the forefront of BBC News programmes covering major news events including three General Elections, the Scottish and EU Referendums, a global pandemic, the wars in Ukraine and Gaza/Israel and the death of the Queen Elizabeth II.

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