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5 of the cheapest ski resorts in Europe this winter

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The Bulgarian ski resort of Borovets comes out on top as the cheapest, where a beer costs just £1.17 and a lift pass costs less than £30 a day.
The Bulgarian ski resort of Borovets comes out on top as the cheapest, where a beer costs just £1.17 and a lift pass costs less than £30 a day

Whether you are a seasoned skier or a first-timer, one thing that is for sure is that skiing can be a very expensive trip. Even if you don’t enrol for a celebrity-like skiing weekend, following on the footsteps of Kim Kardashian, Orlando Bloom, or Gwyneth Paltrow, the costs can pile up. as research shows Brits fork out between £500 and £750 per person on spending money for a ski trip. 

If you are keen to hit the slopes but are being mindful of the pennies, here is a shortlist of five of the cheapest resorts you can visit in Europe, based on the average cost of a lift pass, accommodation, ski rental, and of course food and drinks.

“Skiing can be a very expensive holiday, especially for families. However, there are some fantastic resorts out there offering surprisingly reasonable prices, without compromising on those amazing views and fantastic ski runs”, says Laura Evans-Fisk, head of digital and engagement at eurochange. “Borovets in Bulgaria came out on top as the cheapest ski resort. It’s definitely an underrated destination, with unbelievably low prices for food and drink, and a whole week lift pass for less than £150.” 

Borovets, Bulgaria

Topping the list is bargain-friendly Borovets, Bulgaria. The country is quickly becoming a cheap and cheerful favourite spot for skiers, and it’s easy to see why. Located in the Rila mountains, Borovets is an all-round resort providing luxury amenities at very reasonable prices. With fabulous nightlife as well as gentle slopes for beginners, it’s an ideal destination for adults and families alike. Ski passes start from just £29 per day, so you could really save some cash if you visit for just a few days.  

  • Adult lift pass (6 days): Лв370 (£143.75)
  • Ski rental (6 days): Лв155 (£60.22) 
  • Accommodation (per night): From Лв135 (£52.45) 
  • Beer: Лв3 (£1.17) 
  • Wine: Лв6 (£2.33) 
  • 3-course meal: Лв15 (£5.83) 

Vogel, Slovenia

Lesser known than its Austrian and Italian neighbours, Slovenia’s Vogel resort is no less spectacular. Tucked away in the stunning Julian Alps, Vogel offers exceptional value alongside outstanding snow sports facilities and stunning views. The après is one of the cheapest around, with beer costing just €2, and a three-course meal setting you back just €17. 

Les Houches, France 

For a Mont Blanc ski holiday without the Chamonix prices, look no further than Les Houches. A top choice for families, this picturesque village is quiet at night, while the neighbouring high-altitude areas are perfect for advanced skiers. A six-day adult ski pass is less than £200 and equipment can be rented for less than £100 for the week. 

  • Adult lift pass (6 days): €197 (£158.46) 
  • Ski rental (6 days): from €114 (£91.70) 
  • Accommodation (per night): From €77 (£61.94) 
  • Beer: €2 (£1.61) 
  • Wine: €5 (£4.02) 
  • 3-course meal: €20 (£16.09) 

Livigno, Italy 

Nestled in the heart of the Alps, Italy‘s Livigno offers sterling snowsport facilities for all skill levels, from absolute beginners to black slope aficionados. And thanks to its tax-exempt status, Livigno provides premium resort standards at budget prices, giving you far more for your euros than most other ski destinations on the continent.

  • Adult lift pass (6 days): €223* (£179.38) 
  • Ski rental (6 days): from €74.00* (£59.52) 
  • Accommodation (per night): From €101 (£81.24) 
  • Beer: €3 (£2.41) 
  • Wine: €10 (£8.04) 
  • 3-course meal: €30 (£24.13) 
Grindelwald is one of the more affordable resorts for getting the Swiss ski holiday experience.

Grindelwald, Switzerland

While Switzerland tends to be an expensive country to visit, Grindelwald is one of the more affordable resorts for getting the Swiss ski holiday experience. Even if you’re not a keen skier, there are plenty of other activities to try out, including tobogganing and winter walking.  Set in the beautiful Jungfrau mountains, Grindelwald provides a picture-perfect slice of the Alps for far less than you’d expect.

  • Adult lift pass (6 days): SFr385 (£308.79) 
  • Ski rental (6 days): from SFr237 (£190.09) 
  • Accommodation (per night): From SFr57 (£45.72) 
  • Beer: SFr2 (£1.60) 
  • Wine: SFr13 (£10.43) 
  • 3-course meal: SFr24 (£19.25) 

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New era for tennis in Kazakhstan as juniors reach international level

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Amir Omarkhanov is first Kazakh player to ever reach the Australian Open Junior Championship quarterfinals
Amir Omarkhanov is first Kazakh player to ever reach the Australian Open Junior Championship quarterfinals

Elena Rybakina’s victory at Wimbledon in 2022 was a milestone for tennis in Kazakhstan. Her success caused a mixed reaction, however, raising questions among many observers.

Where were all the tennis players who had been developed in Kazakhstan? Would any of the juniors trained at tennis centres across the country be able to play for national teams, and did Kazakhstan even have a pool of homegrown talent?

To answer these questions, you just need to look at the world rankings. Ten Kazakhstanis finished the 2023 season in the top 100. While some of the players that compete for Kazakhstan in the professional rankings were born elsewhere, all the players in the junior rankings were born and trained in Kazakhstan. Amir Omarkhanov, who in 2024 became the first Kazakh player to ever reach the Australian Open Junior Championship quarterfinals, is ranked 16th in the ITF junior rankings, and Asylzhan Arystanbekova, who made it to the quarterfinals at the junior doubles tournament this year is ranked 53th.  

In 2022, Kazakhstan’s 14U team competed for the first time at a world team championship, where they reached the semi-finals. At the Billie Jean King Cup Juniors Finals in Córdoba, Spain, the Kazakhstani team finished in 9th place among the best 16 teams in the world. This was the first-ever world championship competition for Kazakhstan’s 16U girls team. Meanwhile, the 16U boys team also finished in the top 10 at their debut world championship.  Even back in 2021, juniors from Kazakhstan won a record 37 ITF Juniors tournaments in singles and doubles and reached the finals in 44 others. In Tennis Europe 14 & Under tournaments, players from Kazakhstan won 19 tournaments and reached the finals in 15 more.

These achievements would not have been possible, of course, without proper training and, most importantly, accessible infrastructure. Players who are now 14–16 years old began playing tennis about 10 years ago. Bulat Utemuratov, President of the Kazakhstan Tennis Federation (KTF), played a key role in making tennis accessible to children when he became head of the Federation in 2007. Not long after taking over leadership of the KTF, Utemuratov spearheaded an ambitious effort to build state-of-the-art tennis facilities across the country. Home to only 7 tennis centres and 60 courts in 2007, Kazakhstan now boasts 48 modern facilities with 364 courts, most of which are indoors.  

According to the KTF, the average hourly cost for court rental has decreased from $50 in 2007 to $10 at present. The number of children playing tennis has grown from 900 in 2007 to 30,000 in 2023, and 3,500 of the most talented young players are given an opportunity to train free of charge and have access to the equipment they need as well as tournament support.

In addition to building the required infrastructure, the KTF has also been active at every level, starting with grassroots tennis for 5–7-year-olds.

A great deal of attention is paid to the 10 & Under Tennis project, where children learn the foundations for further growth. KTF experts attend the main tournaments for players 10 and under in order to scout the most promising players in this age group. The Federation also has a targeted programme that provides financial support for more than 100 young players aged 11–14 years old from all over Kazakhstan.

In addition, an important part of the junior development system is the Team Kazakhstan Academy, which was created in 2008 for promising juniors 14 and up. More than 300 of the country’s most talented children, juniors and young tennis players have already passed through the Academy.

The results we have seen from our junior players suggest that investments in the development of tennis infrastructure and targeted programmes for children have helped make tennis in Kazakhstan more accessible and taken it to a qualitatively new level, while also laying a solid foundation for training talented young players. They are the ones who will represent Kazakhstan at professional tournaments in the future, and the country won’t have to bring players from elsewhere.

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Netflix’s ‘The Last Kingdom’ costume exhibition returns to Bamburgh Castle

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Netflix's 'The Last Kingdom' Costume Exhibition Returns to Bamburgh Castle
Entry into The Last Kingdom exhibition costs £17 (adults) and £8.50 (children)

An exhibition showcasing costumes and props from global hit Netflix series The Last Kingdom has returned to Bamburgh Castle, UK.

 
Being displayed for the first time are costumes worn by Mark Rowley (Finan) and Arnas Fedaravičius (Sihtric), both who starred in the show from series two onwards and in the feature-length Netflix movie, Seven Kings Must Die.
 
The exhibition also includes costumes worn by Alexander Dreymon who plays protagonist Uhtred, Thea Sofie Loch Næss who starred as Skade and Cavan Clerkin as warrior-priest Father Pyrlig.
 
To crown it all, destiny is all for visitors who can become queen or king of the north and sit in the Wessex Throne from the series.
 
The Last Kingdom was produced by Carnival Films, which is part of Universal International Studios, a division of Universal Studio Group. Adapted for Netflix from Bernard Cornwell’s historical novels The Saxon Stories,the plot centres on the Anglo-Saxon citadel of Bebbanburg – Uhtred’s ancestral home – today called Bamburgh Castle.
 
“We are delighted that Bamburgh Castle is putting on this exhibition and giving the show’s loyal fans and members of the public the chance to step into The Last Kingdom. The props and costumes are such an integral part of the series, so it seems only right they stand proudly on display in Uhtred’s ancestral home of Bebbanburg,” says Nigel Marchant, Executive Producer and Managing Director of Carnival Films who have loaned the collection.

 
“Carnival Films has curated this fascinating collection of items that will be instantly recognisable to fans of the series and equally intriguing to anyone with an interest in Bamburgh’s past. The exhibition explores how the series was drawn from real life with a plotline inspired by its gripping history,” adds Kate Newman, events manager at Bamburgh Castle.
 
Alongside the exhibition, additional Follow in the Footsteps of Uhtred guided tours led by Ragnar the Viking of award-winning Lundgren Tours, compare the real history of Uhtred with the fictional version. Tours last two-hours long and include free entry into the Castle and staterooms.
 
Entry into The Last Kingdom exhibition is included with general admission (adults £17 / children £8.50. Under-fives free. Family tickets £47.00). Tickets are available on the gate or at www.bamburghcastle.com

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Applications for the Biennale College Danza open until March 8

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Applications for the Biennale College Danza open until 8 March
Young dancers and choreographers have until March 8th to apply for the new edition of Biennale College Danza

Young dancers and choreographers have until March 8th to apply for the new edition of Biennale College Danza. Applications are currently open online on the website of La Biennale di Venezia – www.labiennale.org. Following the creations of Teshigawara and Xie Xin, the revivals of works from the repertories of Crystal Pite, Merce Cunningham, Simone Forti, for the next edition of Biennale College Danza, artistic director Wayne McGregor will be working on a new creation with and for the young dancers, which will premiere on the stage of the 18th International Festival of Contemporary Dance scheduled to take place from July 18th to August 3rd, 2024.

Once again this year, 16 dancers between the ages of 18 and 28 will be selected along with two choreographers, for an intensive immersive residency in Venice: a unique three-month programme to study under the mentorship of great international masters, develop their personal artistic skills, and acquire the practical capabilities required to break into the dance market – from the creation of a portfolio to contracts, and including commissions and intellectual property rights.

From May 6th through August 3rd, the selected young artists will work daily in the Sale d’Armi of the Arsenale, attending classes in classical and contemporary technique and workshops focused on repertory, the creative process, and improvisation with an eye to developing new creations.

With the intent to expand a new generation of dance artists, Biennale College Danza’s theoretical and practical course of studies will conclude within the 18th Festival with the presentation of new choreographic works commissioned by La Biennale.

To find out more about how to apply, please visit the Biennale College Danza official page for application process here.

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