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’Emily in Paris’ begins production of Season 2

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Actress Lily Collins playing Emily in Paris - Netflix
Watched by 58 million households around the world during lockdown ‘Emily in Paris’ is Netflix’s most popular comedy series of 2020

She didn’t make much effort to learn French before relocating from America to work in Paris. And she managed to rent the biggest chambre de bonne, one of the smallest bedsit types in the French capital, ever seen. Once upon a time a chambre de bonne would have been used as a tiny maid’s quarters, but in Emily’s case her quarters were at least the size of a one-bedroom flat. It didn’t stop her from thriving in her job and finding love, as well as annoying French natives on and off the screen throughout the 10 episodes of Netflix’ Emily in Paris.

And now she is back.

The American streaming platform has announced that season 2 of the hit comedy show has started its production in Paris, St. Tropez, and other locations across France.

Created by Darren Star, the producer behind two popular HBO series, Younger and Sex and the City, Emily in Paris stars Lily Collins as, you guessed it: Emily. She is an ambitious twenty-something marketing executive from Chicago who lands her dream job in Paris when her company acquires a French luxury marketing company. Emily is tasked with revamping their social media strategy and dealing with top clients, despite her knowledge of the local language basically consisting of two words: ‘oui’ and ‘croissant’.

The impossible scenario of nice apartments, easy fame (Emily also became an overnight digital ‘influencer’) and swiftly navigating new romances is what seems to have attracted the attention of 58 million households around the world that, while in lockdown last year, chose to binge on ‘Emily in Paris.’ As a result, the show became Netflix’s most popular comedy series of 2020 during its first 28 days – the network confirmed during a recent Academy of Television Arts & Science panel.

 

Lily Collins, a British-American actress and daughter of English musician Phil Collins, acknowledges the show as an escapism tool in a year when most people couldn’t travel much further than their front door.

“As an actor, an artist, and a creative, the most meaningful gift is to connect with people through your art in some way. It’s an honour to be associated with a project that provided people with some much-needed relief during a trying time when everyone was looking for a reason to smile and laugh. Not only did playing Emily teach me more about myself, but also about the world around me. I couldn’t be happier to be back in Paris for season 2 to expand upon those lessons, to continue to grow, and learn even more about this beautiful city and all of its character with Emily.”

Darren Star, the show creator, adds: “From the beginning we always wanted to create this beautiful cinematic view of Paris. The timing of the series release was fortuitous for us as everyone around the world was able to become armchair travellers and live vicariously through our cast. We could not be prouder and are excited to bring more joy to our fans as we start production on Season 2.”

Emily in Paris’ is produced by MTV Entertainment Studios, Darren Star Productions, and Jax Media. The people at Netflix tasked with marketing the show certainly live in the same fantasy world that made Emily a success: the press release announced a resumption of shooting season 2 by including a note from Sylvie Grateau, Emily’s boss at the Savoir Agency in Paris (magnificently played by French actress Philippine Leroy-Beaulieu), highlighting the details of the leading lady’s latest assignment and how essential she is for the company!

Letter Emily in Paris

The truth is that for anyone who watched at least five minutes of the show, the chance of a French boss praising an American employee she despised for a solid 10 episodes is as believable as Emily’s spacious apartment once being inhabited by a maid working for a middle-class family in the 19th century.

 

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London exhibition portraying unfairly censored communities is open until Friday

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Visitors at the Unseen exhibition in London
Female body and race are amongst the content being censored on social media platforms

An exhibition in the United Kingdom is showcasing images of 13 communities censored and silenced on social media platforms.

Unseen’, part of an online community project aiming to open the discussion around digital censorship, is now a public exhibition featuring posts and several stories submitted by people and small businesses who experienced their content and social media accounts being removed or shadow banned. Created by British photographer Rankin, the initiative is on display at Quantus Gallery in Shoreditch, East London.

“Censorship is a necessary tool to prevent fake news, protect children, and more. But it is often used inadvertently to silence marginalised voices,” says creative founder, Rankin. “We have had an incredible response so far, and we’re just getting started. This is an important issue, and those affected deserve to have a voice in the policies that affect them on the platforms they love and build their businesses on.” – defends the photographer known for his portraits of a variety of celebrities, from Kate Moss, Madonna and David Bowie to Queen Elizabeth II and Britney Spears.

Brands, content creators, and body-positive activists and artists have been clashing with social media networks over overly restrictive publishing guidelines for a while, with platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and TikTok regularly banning content posted worldwide.

“It is a continuous, frustrating game of whack-a-mole with platforms, so much so that I have ended up blending my Ph.D. in the moderation of online abuse with my experiences of censorship,” – Says Dr. Carolina Are, a visiting lecturer at the City University of London whom recent work focused on finding frameworks to effectively moderate social media without affecting freedom of expression, and on platforms’ moderation and censorship of nudity and sexuality.

The exhibition ‘Unseen’ will run until June 24th at Quantus Gallery 11-29 Fashion Street, London, E1 6PX.

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One in five UK adults has started a ‘side hustle’ since March 2020

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38% of people surveyed used the money they earnt from a side hustle to pay for rent, clothes and even food | Photo: Jonathan Borba

One in five (19%) adults in the UK have started a ‘side hustle’ since March 2020 and, almost one in six (16%) claim to earn upwards of £1,000 a month from their new venture, according to new research from insurance provider, Aviva, conducted by Censuswide over 10 days in May, 2022.

However, only two thirds of those who started a side hustle over the past two years are still pursuing them today. 37% have returned to their day jobs being their main source of income now that lockdowns are over, and some companies expect employees to return to the office or work from home only partially.

The most popular ‘side hustle’ people chose to pursue was to ‘sell handcrafted products’ (23%), a phenomenon that saw online marketplaces for crafts and vintage items such as Etsy growing exponentially in 2020 and 2021. One in nine (11%) looking for an extra income turned to art, 9% to photography, while a similar number (10%) tried their hand at being a social media influencer – a popular choice with those aged 16-24 (13%). Other income boosters included becoming a courier (6%), driving a taxi (4%), and offering nutritional advice (4%).

When asked what their original motivation was to start a side hustle in addition to their normal, full-time job during the pandemic, most say it was financially motivated. Two in five (39%) people said they did it because they saw an opportunity to turn a hobby into an income; others to ‘make ends meet’ (30%); become financially independent (21%) or to pay off debts (18%).  Over a quarter (27%) started their new vocation to empower themselves/ gain confidence and improve their mental health, while 16% just wanted to practice the skills they had attained (i.e. photography, counseling, etc.).

“The pandemic has transformed how we relate to work. Aviva’s research reveals two sides to this story. For some, the pandemic has brought greater work-life flexibility. This appears to have fuelled a boom in ‘side hustles’. For others, the pandemic has brought greater financial strain, and this appears to have fuelled a need to look elsewhere to make ends meet.” – says Alistair McQueen, Head of Savings & Retirement at Aviva.

On average, side hustlers make around £497 a month from their secondary income, with more than one in four (28%) earning more than £500 a month.

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Young people increasingly struggling to get on the UK property ladder

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Feeling the pinch: 19% of young people living in Cardiff needed to find additional employment to pay their bills, a survey has revealed | Photo: Karolina Grabowska

Despite a property market boom across the UK in recent years, the average age of a first-time buyer is up by almost two years, meaning the average Briton, now, will be 34 years old by the time they purchase their first home. 20 years ago, the average age of a first-time buyer was 31, while in the 1990s it was approximately 29, according to market analysis by Which.

And a recent survey released by independent finance broker KIS Finance has found that over 22% of 18 to 35-year-olds have been forced to take on an additional job as the cost of living crisis deepens, making home ownership out of reach for an increasing number of people.

Last week the Government’s announced a range of steps to try to help more people onto the property ladder. However, exactly how the proposed schemes will work in practice remains to be seen.

The proposal to extend the existing Right to Buy Scheme to include housing association properties could help large numbers onto the property ladder, who thought that home ownership was beyond their reach. This amendment to the original scheme, which was introduced by Margaret Thatcher in 1980 and allowed people to buy their council house at a discounted rate, could see up to 3 million low paid workers buy their own homes.

“Whilst the announcement of measures to help first-time buyers onto the housing ladder will be welcomed, it remains to be seen how the proposals will work in practice. Accepting housing benefit payments toward a mortgage will be a significant change for mortgage providers and it may take some time for the details to be worked through. However, any steps to help support young people to escape from the trap of rented accommodation will be positive and the industry needs to be ready to adapt to support the proposed changes” – says Holly Andrews, MD at KIS Finance.

Key statistics from KIS Finance’s survey also found that 22% of those aged 18 to 35 have taken on an additional job to help them afford basic items such as rent, heating, and food, and a staggering 57% of young British workers reported they are already struggling financially and expect things to get significantly worse in the near future.

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