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Cannes Film Festival is screening classics and new releases at the beach

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La Plage in Cannes ready for daily screenings
10 films will be screened free of charge Cinéma de la plage 2022 | Photo: © Joachim Tournebize / FDC

Featuring a variety of worldwide productions, the Cannes Film Festival’s Cinema de la Plage is screening daily a mix of restored classics, cult films and premieres.

Open to all audiences, the Cinema de la Plage takes place on the beach every evening, from 9:30 pm and remains free of charge. The program, which runs alongside the Official Selection, will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather,” the 40th anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s “E.T.,” as well as Peter Weir’s “The Truman Show” featuring Golden Globe Award winner Jim Carrey.

Other movies on the Cinema de la Plage lineup include “Spinal Tap”, a mocumentary classic of the 1980’s directed by Rob Reiner about a fictional English heavy metal band. A sequel to the film, with the original director and cast, will be released in 2024. Henri Verneuil’s French cinema classic “A Monkey in Winter” with the late Jean-Paul Belmondo, as well as Christian-Jaque’s “Fanfan la tulipe” which had world premiere in competition at the Cannes Film Festival in the 50s, are also part of this year’s lineup.

Cinema de la Plage 2022 lineup until May 28th:

Wednesday, May 18
Spinal Tap (1984, 1h22, United States) directed by Rob Reiner

The cult classic mockumentary of the 80s about a fictional heavy metal will be showcased at the Cinema de la Plage on Wednesday, May 18th, and a sequel to the film is in the works with the original director and cast.

Reiner will direct ‘Spinal Tap II’, expected to hit the screens in 2024, and return as filmmaker Marty DiBergi. Also back are David St. Hubbins (Michael McKean), Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer), and Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest), the nucleus of England’s loudest and sauciest heavy metal band.

 

Thursday, May 19
Le Pacte des loups / Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001, 2h22, France) directed by Christophe Gans

In the Cannes Classics’ selection, a stand-out restoration for an explosive movie! A vibrant story and cast to be rediscovered on the Cannes beach, thanks to Metropolitan.
For the 20th anniversary of Christophe Gans’ Le Pacte des loups, rediscover the unabridged version of this movie in restored 4K Dolby Atmos – with 4K post-production work being supervised by the original film team was put in place and unedited original negatives used to reconstitute the original movie.

 

Est-Ouest (1999) directed by Régis Wargnier

Friday, May 20
Est-Ouest (1999, 2h01, Russia / Ukraine ) directed by Régis Wargnier

A great adventure movie, from one of the genre’s French masters. It was subject to a riveting production diary, and partially filmed in Kiev, Ukraine. This movie was nominated for Best Picture at the César awards and for Best International Feature Film at the Oscars in 2000. Screening this movie is also a way for us to show our support for the Ukrainian people and their hardships. Director Régis Wargnier will be in attendance.

 

Saturday, May 21
The Godfather (1972, 2h55, United States) directed by Francis Ford Coppola

For this monument film’s 50th anniversary, and the 100th anniversary of the MPA (Motion Picture Association), rediscover Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece and the Corleone family’s odyssey. Career-defining performances for a legendary saga.

Sunday, May 22
Un Singe en hiver / A Monkey in Winter (1962, 1h43, France) directed by Henri Verneuil

A French Cinema classic and hommage to the stars of stars, Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Gabin through the story of one night’s drunken shenanigans and memorable dialogue penned by Michel Audiard.

 

La Cour des miracles (Save Our School) directed by Carine May and Hakim Zouhani 

La Cour des miracles (2022) directed by Carine May and Hakim Zouhani

Monday, May 23
La Cour des miracles (Save Our School) directed by Carine May and Hakim Zouhani

Two world premieres will take place on the beach in Cannes as part of the 2022 Cinema de la Plage lineup : Carine May and Hakim Zouhani’s Save Our School, a French comedy about two teachers’ attempts to establish Paris’ first suburban ‘green school’. The screening will be attended by the filmmakers and cast members Anaïde Rozam, Sérigne M’Baye, Gilbert Melki, Sébastien Chassagne and Mourad Boudaoud.

 

Tuesday, May 24
Strictly Ballroom (1992, 1h34, Australia) directed by Baz Luhrmann

Baz Luhrmann’s first film, who is also present this year at Cannes with Elvis in the Official Selection, the visionary director behind Romeo + Juliette, Moulin Rouge! and The Great Gatsby.

All the ingredients are there to awe you: dance, music, glitz and glamour! A stylized and enchanting romantic comedy. The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia, M&A Films, Baz Luhrmann and Spectrum Films have collaborated to digitally preserve and restore Baz Luhrmann’s first feature, Strictly Ballroom in the Cannes Classics’ selection. This 4K restoration utilized original materials held in the NFSA’s collection staying true to the film’s original presentation in 1992.

 

Wednesday, May 25 
Christophe… Definitely(2022, 1h26, France) directed by Ange Leccia and Dominique Gonzales-Foerster

Christophe… définitivement (Christophe… Definitely) a musical documentary directed by Ange Leccia and Dominique Gonzales-Foerster and featuring the story of the unforgettable and nocturnal musician, author of the legendary song Aline (most recently featured in Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch), is also amongst the new films scheduled to premiere for the public at the French Riviera.

 

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), directed by Steven Spielberg

Thursday, May 26
E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982, 1h55, United-States) directed by Steven Spielberg

Spielberg, E.T. and Cannes. Still to this day, those names put together elicit excitement and enthusiasm from the world and festival-goers, the same excitement and enthusiasm already there in 1982 as this film from Steven Spielberg still enchants generations. This movie, which was shown at the Closing Ceremony of the 35th Festival de Cannes the 26th of May 1982, will have a comeback on the same day this year. It was the last movie shown at the old Palais des Festivals and holds a special place for its director and the Festival. Let us all together celebrate this legendary movie’s 40th anniversary and communal history this coming Thursday May the 26th, on the Cannes beach!

 

Friday, May 27
Fanfan la tulipe (1952, 1h42, France) directed by Christian-Jaque

For Cannes native Gérard Philipe’s 100th birthday anniversary, one of his most iconic movies which was in Competition in 1952 and won the Best Director Award. An opportunity to rediscover this iconic actor, hand in hand with Gérard Philipe, le dernier hiver du Cid, a documentary on the actor screening in the Cannes Classics’ selection.

 

Saturday, May 28
The Last Picture Show (1971, 1h58, United States) directed by Peter Bogdanovich

Wrapping up the screenings of the Cinéma de la plage 2022 and a last hommage to one the great cinephile film directors, Peter Bogdanovich!  The bittersweet story of two friends growing up in rural America through hardship, military enlistment, heartbreak and alcohol-fueled road trips.

Marcio Delgado is a Journalist, Producer and Influencer Marketing Manager working with brands and publications in Europe, America and Asia.

Lifestyle

UK May bank holiday set to be busiest since Covid

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A busy motorway in the UK during the sunset
More than four million journeys are planned on Friday, May 24th, for the long Bank holiday weekend in the UK

More than 20m leisure journeys are expected to be made by car this late May bank holiday as traffic returns close to 2019’s pre-pandemic levels, according to a new study of drivers’ getaway plans from the RAC and INRIX.

Analysis suggests the worst day to travel will be Friday 24 May when more than 4m journeys are planned, as this is not only the start of the long weekend but also the beginning of half term for many UK schools. Traffic volumes look set to remain consistently high throughout the long weekend as 3.7m trips are expected to take place on Saturday 25 May, while 3.4m journeys are anticipated on both Sunday and bank holiday Monday.

With a further 5.7m leisure trips by car planned at some point throughout the long weekend, traffic could be at its worst since 2019 when over 22m drivers hit the road during the same period – meaning the volume of getaways this year could reach 90% of pre-pandemic levels.

The data also indicates that day trips are top of many drivers’ itineraries for the late May bank holiday. Twenty-two per cent said the main reason they’ll use their car will be for a day out with friends or family, while 8% intend to spend a day in the countryside or by the beach. Staycations rank third on the list as 7% said they are planning a short break, while a smaller proportion (3%) are heading to an airport or ferry port over the long weekend.

Traffic is predicted to build through the day on Friday, with transport analytics specialists INRIX advising motorists to delay their departures until 6pm to miss the worst of the queues when both commuter and leisure drivers are sharing the roads. The M25 clockwise between J7 for the M23 and J21 for the M1 is expected to bear the brunt of the traffic with those travelling on this stretch suffering delays of more than an hour and a half in the late afternoon.

On Saturday, traffic is expected to peak between 3pm and 6pm, with motorists advised to start their journeys as early as possible in the day to be in with the best chance of avoiding traffic. With day trips expected to be particularly popular, and even more so in those areas which see the best of the sun and warmth, INRIX is expecting routes from cities to coasts to have some of the worst delays as drivers head to the seaside. In the middle of the day, the M5 southbound – a major holiday route – is likely to suffer major hold-ups with journeys on a 45-mile stretch between J16 north of Bristol and J25 for Taunton in Somerset expected to take over an hour longer than usual.

Elsewhere, snarl ups are also anticipated on Saturday afternoon on the M25 anticlockwise towards the M23, the A14 eastbound towards the east coast, as well as on the M3 and A34 that funnel large volumes of leisure traffic towards resorts on the south coast.

Meanwhile the clockwise M25 is expected to again be the busiest route for traffic at the end of the school half term on Friday 31 May, with journeys between the M23 and the M1 likely to nearly triple in duration to three hours.

“Our research suggests this weekend could be the busiest of the year so far on the roads, with millions of people embarking on getaway trips to make the most of the three days and, for those with school age children, the start of the half-term holiday,” says RAC Breakdown spokesperson Alice Simpson.

“In fact, we’re looking at possible leisure traffic volumes returning to levels similar to what we last saw in 2019 before the coronavirus outbreak, as drivers’ desire to make the most of the UK increases. And, in those places where the warm spring sunshine makes its presence felt, the number of people deciding to get behind the wheel and head for the coast or countryside will only go up, swelling the overall volume of cars on the roads.”

Met Office spokesperson Stephen Dixon said: “While there’s still plenty of detail to work out for the Bank Holiday weekend, signals are suggesting there’s a chance of some dry and fine weather developing in places for the UK, though periods of showery activity will still influence some of the weather. Temperatures should above average for the time of year, though will be slightly subdued where those showers do develop. There remains a chance for the development of some thundery showers in places through the weekend, which is something we’ll be able to add some more detail to as we get closer to the time. It’s important to stay up-to-date with the forecast through the week as the details become clearer.”

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27 artists illustrate the power of voting ahead of EU elections

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A woman and a child checks an exhibition in EU about voting
Pan-European online initiative also has pop-up exhibitions | Photo: Mihail Novakov

Ahead of the forthcoming European elections, 27 illustrators, one from each European Union member state, designed posters on the topic of democratic participation. 

This happens as part of Get Out & Vote – an initiative by Fine Acts, a global nonprofit studio for social impact.

All works are published under an open license, so that citizens, nonprofits and activists can download and use them non–commercially to spread the message of the importance of voting for the future of Europe.

“It is so incredibly important to vote, as our elected officials shape our societies for us. I think a lot of people find the elections hard to grasp and overwhelming – especially the European Parliament elections. And I get it, it’s complex. But if you don’t vote, others will decide for you! These are big decisions, like climate, immigration, AI and we get to shape those choices together,” says Sidsel Sørensen, an illustrator and animation director based in Copenhagen, Denmark. Between concept and development, Sørensen spent several days to finish her participant image.

“Usually I spend fairly long at the ideas stage, sketching things out. Often jumping in and out of the process over a couple of days. With this election, there might be a right-wing shift in the European Parliament. I hope not, as it would be very bad for European climate policy. The inspiration for the image really came from focusing on the positive, and instead imagining how much legislation at EU level could help guide green policies across Europe – if we all vote more green,” says the artist.

For Italian illustrator Mattia Riami, who attended the Visual Communication Bachelor at IED in Milan on a scholarship and went on to be part of the team of graphic designers and illustrators at global fashion brand United Colors Of Benetton, voting is a civil exercise that should not be ignored.

“Voting is not just a right, but also a civic duty that strengthens the foundations of democratic society. Through voting, every individual has the opportunity to voice their ideas, values, and concerns, thus contributing to the creation of a more inclusive and representative political environment. Ignoring this process means abdicating the responsibility to shape one’s own future and that of future generations,” believes Riami, who spent a total of three days to create his illustration for the project.

“Today we find ourselves faced with a set of challenges that threaten to undermine democracy in Europe, and erode common values such as equality and justice. Our poster voting collection targets young people and aims to inspire hope, optimism, and enthusiasm about the potential impact of voting,” says Yana Buhrer Tavanier, Executive Director at Fine Acts. The initiative, supported by the Culture of Solidarity Fund, is part of Fine Acts’ larger campaign in support of European unity and values, which also includes art interventions across several European cities, an AR exhibition, and a vast online activation to build momentum before the elections in June. 

How the European Elections work

Voting in 2024 starts on Thursday 6 June in the Netherlands, followed by Ireland and Malta on the following day and Latvia and Slovakia on Saturday. This year Many EU member states vote on Sunday 9 June.

Most voting takes place on one day although Czechs have Friday and Saturday to cast their ballots, and Italians vote on Saturday and Sunday.

Besides voting in European elections on Sunday, Belgians will also spend time voting in national and regional elections.

By the end of 9 June, it will be clear which parties have won the Parliament’s 720 seats, 15 more than in 2019. The UK took part in the last European elections before leaving the EU, and some of its seats have since been redistributed or kept in reserve if the EU expands.

Who can vote in the European Elections

In most EU countries you have to be 18 to vote, but if you’re 16 you can vote in Germany, Austria, Belgium and Malta, while in Greece the minimum age is 17. In a handful of countries including Luxembourg and Bulgaria, voting is compulsory.

You should bring some ID such as driving license, PPS card, or passport. A full list of acceptable ID is available on electoralcommission.ie. Acceptable ID is also listed on the back of your polling card and includes passports and driving licences.

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Cannes opens with French comedy and honorary award for Meryl Streep

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Actress Juliette Binoche hands an award to Meryl Steep
Meryl Streep receives a honorary Palme D’Or from Juliette Binoche | Photo: Andrea Rentz

The 77th edition of the Cannes Film Festival officially opened last night with Quentin Dupieux’s Le Deuxième Acte (The Second Act), and an honorary Palme d’Or awarded to American actress Meryl Streep.

Presented Out of Competition as a world premiere on the Croisette last night, May 14, this four-part comedy was also released in all French cinemas on the same day. The film stars Lea Seydoux, Vincent Lindon, Louis Garrel and Raphaël Quenard playing squabbling actors filming a movie produced and directed by artificial intelligence.

The opening ceremony of the 77th Festival de Cannes, hosted at the  Grand Théâtre Lumière, also had American actress Meryl Streep as a guest of honour.

Streep received the Festival’s Honorary Palme d’or, 35 years after winning the Best Actress award for Evil Angels, her only appearance in Cannes until last night.

“My mother, who is usually right about everything, said to me: ’Meryl, my darling, you’ll see. It all goes so fast. So fast,″ added Streep. “And it has, and it does. Except for my speech, which is too long,” said the three time Oscar award-winning actress.

Last year French Film director Justine Triet won the Cannes Film Festival Palme d’Or for her murder mystery film “Anatomy of a Fall” becoming the third female filmmaker ever to win the prize, which was first awarded in 1955. 

The 77th Cannes Film Festival is set to run until May 25th, when the Palme d’Or winners will be revealed, 2024.

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